ESL B - Unit 1 Comic Book Project

Write Your Own Legend
Over the past marking period, we have studied the five elements of fiction using American Born Chinese as our whole class text. One of the stories in ABC is the legend of the Monkey King, which shows how he went from zero to hero as he learned to accept himself for who he is—a monkey.

Your job as a writer is to transform yourself into a legend. Put yourself into the shoes of a hero, like the Monkey King or if you prefer, a villain, like the Dragon King and develop your story about something amazing that you could do. Then, you will create a comic book to tell your legend. Your story will be shared with a wider audience on our class blog.
Use the attached outline and fill out the requirements before completing the first draft of your legend. Make sure you show me your ideas before you begin writing. Remember that legends are a genre of the narrative writing form. Therefore, they have many of the same characteristics. However, there are a few differences that you must keep in mind when creating your piece:

  1. People believe that legends are true stories.
  2. Legends are stories that are set in a real time or place in the past.
  3. The main character is much braver than other people and does something heroic.
  4. Legends are told over and over again.

Once you have created your legend, you must create a short comic strip representing what happens in your story. See the following resources for more information about what a good comic strip needs and resources where you can create your comic strip.

What Are Comic Strips?

http://www.teachingcomics.org/
http://www.humblecomics.com/comicsedu/resources/rubric.doc

Where Can I Make Comic Strips?
http://www.makebeliefscomix.com/Comix/
http://www.pixton.com


Rubric (Authored by Gene Yang (http://www.geneyang.com)

Category
4
3
2
1
Panel Sizes & Shots
Consistent use of panel size and/or shots to emphasize the information and/or emotional content of the work.
Some examples of using panel size and/or shots to emphasize the information and/or emotional content of the work.
One or two examples of using panel size and/or shots to emphasize the information and/or emotional content of the work.
Panel sizes and the framing of shots confuse, rather than add to, the story.
Transitions & Layout
Most panel-to-panel transitions are well-planned and appropriate to the information and/or emotions conveyed. Panel order and word balloon order within panels are always clear.
Some panel-to-panel transitions are well-planned and appropriate to the information and/or emotions conveyed. Panel order and word balloon order within panels are usually clear.
One or two examples of well-planned panel-to-panel transitions. Panel order and word balloon order within panels are sometimes confusing.
Most panel-to-panel transitions are random and haphazard. Panel order and word balloon order within panels are consistently confusing.
Artwork
The artwork is consistently readable and understandable. Characters are always distinguishable from one another. The art style closely matches the tone of the story.
The artwork is usually readable and understandable. Characters are usually distinguishable from one another. The art style loosely matches the tone of the story.
The artwork is sometimes illegible. Two of the characters look the same. The art style neither adds to nor takes away from the tone of the story.
The artwork is illegible. Many of the characters look the same. The art style contradicts the tone of the story.
Writing
No misspelled words or grammatical errors.
Only one or two misspelled words or grammatical errors.
A few misspelled words or grammatical errors.
Many misspelled words and/or grammatical errors.
Lettering
Lettering is neat and legible. Ample space is always given to the lettering in word balloons and captions.
Lettering is adequate. Ample space is usually given to the lettering in word balloons and captions.
Lettering is somewhat messy. Some examples of lettering crammed into word balloons and captions.
Letter is illegible. Lettering is consistently crammed into word balloons and captions.